The use of ski area premises and facilities and participation at Mount Sima/Friends of Mount Sima Society is subject to the conditions set out in the Exclusion of Liability and Assumptions of Risks Notice and the Release of Liability, Waiver of Claims, Assumption of Risks and Indemnity Agreement (the ``Release Agreement``)
Read Carefully: Exclusion of Liability Notice
For on hill emergencies only
867-689-6056
Ski Patrol Sima Top Hut
Sima Patrol Team
Sima Volunteer Patrol

RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS, ASSUMPTION OF RISKS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENT

Mount Sima has a highly trained ski patrol that are on duty every operating day. The patrol consists of both paid staff and volunteers from the Canadian Ski Patrol, a national organization that provides patrollers to ski areas across Canada. Patrol provides safety and first aid on the hill during regular operating hours. They are also working when the hill is closed to the public carrying out operational and safety tasks such as fencing and signage, as well as practising rescue and rope skills.  All patrollers are trained to the same level of first aid and rescue skills. We work as a team to provide a safe and fun family atmosphere and are always willing to help. 

If you ever need Patrol help you can ask guest services or any other staff member to call them for you on the radios that all staff carry, or you can call 867-689-6056. You can also find the patrol at the top of the mountain in the top floor of the two-story public building next to the chairlift offload area, where they standby to respond to any accidents on the mountain. Look for the ski patrol flag and come in for a visit and warm up in front of the wood stove.

If you ever have a safety-related concern, don’t hesitate to report it to the patrol in person or call the patrol at 867-689-6056. You can also speak to guest services in the main lodge or our friendly lift attendants. Ski and ride safe!

CSP Yukon Zone: www.yukonskipatrol.ca

Skiing, snowboarding and other activities that take place at ski areas involve the risk of injury. The information contained in this section of this website is intended to inform you of the risks, dangers and hazards that you may encounter at a ski area and help you to stay safe while enjoying these activities. Whether you are a participant in these activities or a parent or guardian of a minor participant, please take the time to familiarize yourself with the Safety and Risk Awareness information on this website and at skisafety.ca

Alpine Ski/Snowboard Boot Binding Systems

The ski boot/binding system for alpine skiing may not release during every fall or may release unexpectedly. The ski boot/binding system is no guarantee that the skier will not be injured.

The snowboard boot/binding system is not designed or intended to release and will not release under normal circumstances. Given the snowboard boot binding system is a non-system, the system will not reduce the risk of injury during a fall and will increase the risk of not surviving an avalanche.

 

Helmets

A helmet designed for recreational snow sports may reduce the risk of some types of head injuries. Helmets are strongly recommended. In some ski area programs (for example snow school lessons involving minors) helmets are mandatory. Helmets for skiing and snowboarding are light, comfortable and have achieved wide-spread acceptance. Please note however that helmets have limitations and that serious head injury can still occur even  when a helmet is worn. Wearing a helmet is no guarantee of safety.

Using Terrain Parks

Be Park Smart

When riding in Terrain Parks, there are a number of specific etiquette and safety practices that all users should follow.

The basics of terrain park safety are outlined in the Smart Style – Park Smart Terrain Safety Program.

  • START SMALL. Work your way up. Build your skills.
  • MAKE A PLAN. Every feature. Every time.
  • ALWAYS LOOK before you drop.
  • RESPECT the features and others.
  • TAKE IT EASY. Know your limits. Land on your feet.

Before you drop in:

  • Read the entrance signs – each entrance is marked with a unique sign stating park terrain difficulty levels. Please follow within your ability and always be in control.
  • Take a warm up run – it is recommended that you take a ride through the park and check it out so you can get a visual of what to expect and the confidence to succeed.
  • Progression – to progress through jumps and features gradually increase the challenge and difficulty. Don’t attempt maneuvers that are beyond your ability.
  • Start small – if you’re new to riding terrain parks, we recommend that you start small with beginner features and get the basics down and work your way up. If you are having trouble, take a lesson.
  • Helmets are highly recommended.

Closed means closed – know when to avoid terrain and features

  • If you see a rope line, fencing, signs or bamboo across a takeofft it is up for a reason.  Please do not remove and do not ride those features. If you have any questions or concerns find one of the Park staff.
  • Let the Park staff do their job – if you see Park staff working on a feature, please skip that feature and come back when they are done.
  • If there are boards or skis in front of a jump, the jump is closed so go around the feature.

Practice Park Etiquette

  • Don’t stop or sit on landings and knuckles – if you need to stop and take a break for a moment do not sit where people cannot see you.
  • Keep landings clear – never stop to take a break in a landing, bottom of roller or anywhere that you are not visible to riders uphill from you. Clear the landing area to avoid collisions.
  • Do not ride through landings. When not using features, stay off to the side of the trail, out of the way.
  • Use features in the manner in which they are intended. Don’t jump off the sides of the takeoffs. Save the takeoff lips for the people who want to ride the feature correctly. Practice riding on small jumps or rollers instead.
  • Do not snake – be courteous of your fellow park riders, call your drops and give people a decent amount of time and space when waiting to ride a feature to avoid cutting people off.
  • Slow down when exiting the terrain park.

Know before you go!

In addition to the Alpine Responsibility Code, here are some additional tips to keep you safe and enjoy your day on the slopes:

  • Weather
    • Plan ahead for variations in weather. Dress appropriately, and have properly tuned gear. Warmth and visibility are key safety components.
    • UV rays are reflected from the snow surface. Always wear sunscreen, and goggles or sunglasses, even on cloudy days.
    • Cold temperatures increase the likelihood of frostbite. Dress warm, bring extra layers and keep an eye on exposed skin. Go inside immediately if skin begins to turn white.
    • Take note of the conditions. When the snow surface is hard and fast, it is easy to ski/ride at high speed, increasing the risk for serious injury if you fall and slide.  Be aware of changing snow surface conditions.
  • Keep hydrated and carry a snack with you to keep you fueled.
  • Ski with a buddy.
    • Identify meeting points with your group in case you become separated. All group members should know where to meet should separation occur.
    • Carry a whistle and be particularly cautious when skiing/riding in the trees. Tree wells are a real risk.
  • Helmets – it is highly recommended to wear a helmet while skiing and riding. Skiers and snowboarders are encouraged to educate themselves on the benefits and limitations of helmet usage.  See more on snow sports helmets. 
  • Don’t over do it. Be aware of fatigue, many visitors are on vacation and might not be conditioned to ski/board long days. Warm up in the morning and stretch it out, then tone it down in the afternoon.
  • Snowcats and snowmobiles may be encountered during operating hours. Give these vehicles plenty of space.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
    • Be mindful of where you stop on the hill, for your safety and the safety of other skiers and snowboarders. When resting, move over to the side of the run. Never stop under a roller, jump, cat track, or on a blind corner, as uphill skiers will not be able to see you.
    • Always be aware of other skiers and snowboarders. Look uphill before you commence downhill, and yield to other skiers and snowboarders.
  • Mt. Sima does not allow guests to ski or ride while carrying infants in any type of backpack or baby carrier.

Ski Area Premises

When visiting a ski area, the premise is not limited to the ski runs – many ski areas will have day lodges, parking lots, restaurants, tube/tobogganing areas, terrain parks, walkways, access roads and other ski area facilities. You will come across signage throughout the ski area premise that are important to respect and understand.  Please pay close attention to all signage. It is present for the safety of both guests and employees. Failing to follow the directions on these signs may result in the loss of your ticket or pass. It is your responsibility to be aware of mountain signage at all times.

Most ski areas mark their operational boundaries with fencing or signage.

The terrain within the ski area boundary is patrolled by the ski patrol and some hazards are marked. The area beyond the ski area boundary is neither controlled nor patrolled by the ski patrol. Some ski areas permit skiers and snowboarders to travel beyond the ski area boundary into the backcountry. Backcountry travel can be very hazardous and requires specialized equipment, training and experience. Do not travel into the backcountry if you are not qualified to do so. Some ski areas may close their ski area boundaries or portions of the boundary. A closure sign must be respected and obeyed. Breach of a closure could result in the loss of ski area privileges and other sanctions.

Skiing and snowboarding in closed runs and areas is strictly prohibited.  Runs are closed for several reasons: trees have fallen onto the run, ditches or holes have rendered the run unsafe, a race or other events are taking place, Terrain Parks are not yet ready to open, or perhaps machinery is operating.  Observe and obey all posted signs and warnings. Ignoring these messages may put you at greater risk. Those who violate closures may lose lift privileges.

There are a number of different signs and markers to indicate conditions, boundaries and warnings on the Ski Area Premise.

All poles, flags, fencing, signage and padding on equipment or objects or other forms of marking devices are used by the ski area to inform you of the presence or location of a potential obstacle or hazard. These markers are no guarantee of your safety and will not protect you from injury. It is part of your responsibility under the Alpine Responsibility Code to avoid all obstacles or hazards, including those that are so marked. Inbound terrain includes natural hazards including cliffs and cornices. Ski with caution, unmarked objects and hazards may exist.

The designation of run difficulty is set by each ski area individually. Skiers and riders should be advised that a Green Circle, Blue Square or Black Diamond trails are not necessarily the same as a similarly rated trail at another area. Skiers and riders should work their way up, beginning with the easiest trails, no matter what their ability level may be, until they are familiar with the trails at each ski area.

Walking in ski areas should not be overlooked as a risk, with potential for serious injuries.  There are many wet, icy, slippery surfaces through the ski area premise.  Slips, trips and falls are common and all users should take precautions at all times when travelling throughout a ski area.  Ski boots and many types of other footwear do not provide good traction, and extra caution should be used when walking.